by | Aug 23, 2021

Talking about Emotions Testing Research at Pangborn

Earlier this month, we participated in the Pangborn Sensory Science Symposium. We attended many of the sessions in the new and emerging sensory and consumer research methods.

In addition to learning from the sessions at the show, we presented on consumer emotions both in our presentation and poster session. InsightsNow’s Chief Research Officer Greg Stucky discussed “Emotions are fleeting, and are they reproducible?” as part of the track “Beyond Food—Sensory Learning from Other Categories” at the show. His session dug into sensory cues, such as aromas, and how they invoke an immediate emotional response. Emotions are absolutely critical to innovation because they are the pathway to our behavior from sensory cues. By understanding and leveraging the right emotions, brands can influence people’s behaviors.

Because emotions are so fast and fleeting it can be a real challenge to measure them, so our session delved into some of the effective market research approaches we have for measuring emotions. By digging into how the InsightsNow Implicit / Explicit Test™ works, the presentation uncovered how effective this approach can be for emotions testing.

Greg and our senior research director Kenny McMahon also presented on consumer emotions during our poster session on: “The Newness Effect: Comparing emotions of currently used products vs a brand never tried.” The poster showed how consumers today have many choices, whether it be deciding to try a new product or a whole new category.. Therefore, manufacturers can benefit from having Behavioral Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) which indicate product and brand health. Understanding the impact of a new product entering a category using Behavioral KPIs such as Implicit Emotional Measurement and Lift Metrics provide an early indicator of future category sales share and help prioritize product development and brand awareness activities beyond traditional measures such as Overall Liking. The poster goes on to cover “The Newness Effect,” and emotions testing.

Curious to learn more about emotions testing? Reach out to us.